Mays Raider Termarr Johnson is the No. 1 High School Baseball Player in the Country

A huge congratulations goes out to Benjamin E. Mays High School senior Termarr Johnson, who has been ranked the No. 1 high school baseball player in the country, according to Baseball America and Prep Baseball Report.

An undeniably talented shortstop, Termarr’s stats speak volumes. During spring 2021, the Mays Raider boasted a .417 batting average, 9 homeruns, 23 stolen bases, 8 doubles, and 5 triples.

Known for his versatile playing style, powerful hitting and unique swing, Termarr plays various bases, including infield, outfield, and center field, which makes him a serious threat on the diamond.

“It feels good, and it’s definitely an honor to be ranked the No. 1 high school baseball player,” said Termarr, who wears No. 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson. “The higher I’m ranked, the more I realize that I have to be a role model. You have to demonstrate how to carry yourself as one of those players, and you have to go out and play that way.”

Termarr, 17, has been playing baseball nearly his entire life. Termarr’s father Terry – who played high school baseball and football – introduced him to T-ball at the tender age of 3, and Termarr’s love for the game quickly blossomed.

Baseball has since become a family affair. Termarr’s older brother, Trevell, a sophomore at Georgia Tech, plays baseball on scholarship, and his oldest brother, Tervont, works as a high school baseball coach while also serving as a volunteer coach with Georgia Tech’s baseball team.

“My father and brothers instilled in me the love of baseball,” said Termarr, who plays baseball year-round at circuit and showcase events, as well as with his travel team, the Astros. “They helped me develop physically just by playing the game. And my mom, Kim, has been my rock throughout this process. She’s the person I can trust and talk to. She’s caring and has done a lot for me.”

With high school graduation now on the horizon, Termarr intends to either attend college to play baseball or enter the draft for the minor leagues.

“At the end of the day, I’ve always wanted to play pro baseball and become a pro player,” said Termarr, a scholar-athlete with a 4.25 GPA, who is currently being recruited by various Division I, Southeastern (SEC) and Pacific Atlantic Conference (PAC) colleges. “So, if I have to go to college next year or whether I go pro, I’m good with whatever road I have to take. I don’t have a preference. My options are really open right now.”

With the minor league draft scheduled for July 2022, Termarr remains focused on his love for the game. And while his draft prospects look incredibly promising, Termarr insists that he doesn’t have a dream team. He simply wants the opportunity to play baseball at the next level.

“At the end of the day, I just love playing baseball,” he said. “I can play it everyday. I can never stop putting down the bat or putting down the ball. I have bats and balls in my room. I play around with them even when I’m bored. I love the game, and I’m just happy to play at the level I’m at right now.”

For Termarr, his passion for baseball is not only all-consuming – it’s also strategic.

“In baseball, you have to really think about the situation and how you want to approach it,” he said, noting that when he’s not playing baseball, he spends time practing with his brother, Trevont, and longtime trainer, Carl Nichols. “For me, baseball teaches me what I need to know to be better in life, and how to fail. In order to succeed in life, you have to fail first. Baseball teaches me a lot and helps me be a better person.”

Termarr already has big plans for the future.

“I see myself being a major league player, and hopefully a superstar,” he said boldly.

Mays’ assistant baseball coach Michael Jennings – who describes Termarr as an “amazing, articulate, and smart young man” – has no doubt that he will make it to the major leagues.

“Whether in the classroom or on the baseball diamond, Termarr exemplifies the academic and athletic prowess needed to be successful in any endeavor encountered in life,” said Jennings, who coached Termarr’s brothers in high school. “I know beyond a doubt that he will have successful career in the game of baseball.”

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